The real use for Twitter in CU's (and Banks)

Screw banks and CU’s using Twitter.  It is over rated and doesn’t give you any ROI.  I don’t care if you are having a seminar on credit reports or a shred day.  Pilcher’s Twitter directory is fine and dandy and it does a great job demonstrating that nobody is using Twitter except to regurgigate tired marketing messages.  Twitter could be a real communication tool for your members if it is a medium they are currently using.  You’ve surveyed your members and done your market research so you know what percentage of your membership is on Twitter, right?

Why the hell don’t we actually make Twitter a useful communication tool?  Think about how text banking works.  I text bal to MYCUBAL or whatever and 10 or 20 seconds goes by and my balance comes back.  Whoo hoo.  Why don’t we do the same thing with Twitter?  Log into online banking and link your Twitter username to your online banking account.  Tweet a direct message to your credit union with a command like bal or last 5.  The CU’s application grabs the direct message, looks up the Twitter username in online banking and pulls the balance out of the OFX server or directly from the core.  Then the application direct messages the CU member back.

Duh.  Seems like a no brainer to me.  Let’s get off the marketing band wagon with Twitter and figure out how to actually make it a useful tool for our membership.

Update:  I was just catching up on my feeds and noticed the post at The Financial Brand about the How To: Twitter for FI’s guide.  Look at the bullet points:

  • Promote new products and offers
  • Share personal finance tips
  • Express their brand and reveal their personalities
  • Build community outreach programs
  • Provide information about community events and activities
  • Increase exposure for their charitable and philanthropic efforts

Pick one of those that isn’t marketing and show me one useful thing that a member could use any of that for.  Oh wait, you can’t.

Batch Mode

Batch mode is for baking cookies. Not financial transactions. In today’s modern computer era, so many vital functions are still run behind the scenes on mainframe computers passing files around on the back end trying to make things work.  What is the big hold up with getting with the times?  Are core processor’s and credit/debit card providers afraid of interoperability?  Is there anything us lowly credit unions can do to encourage a little better behavior?